To notice this is sublime

Origin and Etymology of sublime: Middle English, from Middle French sublimer, from Medieval Latin sublimare to refine, sublime, from Latin, to elevate, from sublimis.

“I will not live an unlived life.”*

Seth Godin writes about all the “sirens” that can go off in life, but:

‘Which one turns our heads, gets our attention and breaks our rhythm?’**

When we notice what we notice we may be raising something to our eye-level that shapes our lives … and those of others.

When Alan Lightman notices how the forces of technology are robbing him of his inner life, he moved to action:

‘In an odd way, my growing understanding of the vast forces that shape modern life has only increased my resolve to counter those forces, to build a parallel universe for my inner life and spirit.  I am convinced that such an interior world is both possible and necessary.’^

I notice what Lightman notices because he speaks of something I am increasingly noticing.  This world of technology and the interior life is our “playground” to which we bring our imagination.

But we all notice different things and we bring our imagination to bear on these (this will be another post).  Lightman reminds us of this; I feel there is a sense of noticing what we notice in his closing words:

‘Only individuals can measure their own values and needs, their own spirit, their own story of life.’^

(*Dawna Markova, quoted in the Northumbria Community’s Morning Prayer.)
(**From Seth Godin’s blog What makes your sirens go off … .)
(^From Alan Lightman’s A Sense of the Mysterious.)

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