three days of possibility

23-sophie-had-to

‘When the poet is in [her] gifted states, the world seems generous, exhaling odours and aura toward [her].’*

She assumes a basic position for mindful wandering.  Seated with both feet on the floor, connecting with the earth from which she comes.  Head raised, in the “heavens,” wondering where she might go.  Hands open, relaxed on her lap, prepared to receive what comes.  Breathing slowly and deeply.

‘What are the most important next steps?  Your action items for the next three days?’**

What will she do with three days of possibility, three days to follow her heart’s desire?

First of all, she clears her diary of all the things she’s got planned, enabling her to ponder the things her life is telling her she MUST do.

‘Massively up the amount of novelty in your life; the research suggests that new environments and experiences are often  the jumping off point for new ideas (more opportunities for pattern recognition).’^

These three days are about connecting to her story and her awareness of possibility.

Next, she returns all the things into her diary she’d taken out, knowing her story and its possibilities will still be there.

We don’t need anything more to be who we are: our head may say we do but our heart says “I have enough.”

Sophie tells the Big Friendly Giant, there’re all kinds of rules the children in her orphanage have to obey “like getting out of bed at night, or not folding up your clothes,” or “you get punished.”^^

And there are many rules we’ve made up or have accepted from others: “People like me can never do what our heart’s desire” and “We have to wait to be picked.”   These three days help us to let go of them.  The universe is more generous, its primal laws more inviting:

“To me the converging objects of the universe flow.  All are written to me, and I must get what the writing means.”*^

(*From Lewis Hyde’s The Gift.)
(**From U.Lab Portobello.)
(^From Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler’s Bold.)
(^^From Roald Dahl’s The BFG.)
(*^Walt Whitman, quoted in Lewis Hyde’s The Gift.)

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