Holy things

We not only create stories for metaphors of life, we create them as metaphors for a meaningful lifeTo live meaningfully is to be at perpetual risk. […] If, should the protagonist fail, life would go back to normal, the story is not worth telling.*
Robert McKee

The meaningful life may come to us in an unusual guise.

Yesterday I was pondering holy discontent. When we notice something is wrong and are compelled to do something about.

Consecration follows: giving oneself to the need or cause we have perceived.

I use this word because it suggests we understand there to be something extraordinary about what we are about to do, like the Blues Brothers on their mission for God.

On the outside it will likely look ordinary, earthly and just hard work.

On the inside it is a holy thing that will bring beauty into the world, even if that is only one person’s world.

In keeping with all things that are worthwhile, it will require risk, the leaving of the familiar and safe, misunderstood by others, being a lifelong learner.

*From Robert McKee‘s newsletter: A Little Risk Goes a Long Way)

2 thoughts on “Holy things

  1. Your spirited (art) work is engaging… lively. Thank you.

    I relate to much of what’s being said, here, as well.

    There was a time I believed I was writing my story — now I feel I am a story being written by (the) Unknowable.

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