The noticing of nuance

If you’re mindless, then you don’t notice nuance.*
(Ben Hardy)

For good craftsman, routines are not static; they evolve, the craftsmen improve.**
(Richard Sennett)

We find ourselves in a wonderful world.  Simply magical.  Everything charged with a richness yet to be discovered.

And we have incredible bodies and brains that can discover and then accommodate a limitless number of upgrades in response to this deep fecundity:

“Our world, and the worlds around and within it, is aflame with shades of brilliance we cannot fathom – and is far more vibrant, far more holy, than we could ever imagine.”^

I am staggered by the unimaginable numbers of possibilities.

Richard Sennett suggests that we all can develop ways of more richly creating within this world, with these bodies;

‘I’ve kept for the end of this book it’s most controversial proposal: that nearly everyone can become good craftsmen.  The proposal is controversial because modern society sorts people along a strict gradient of ability.  The better you are at something, the fewer of you there are.’**

When we believe such a story, those who are not “the few” have to pick up the rest of what is available.  Yet, when we notice the endless nuance, the universe has provided us each with the possibility of journeying through our lives in pursuit of something we love and that is meaningful.

We can tell one another different stories to the norm, encouraging openness to our worlds and the others within these and what they bring – some part of the richness in which we can flourish.

(*From Benjamin Hardy’s Willpower Doesn’t Work.)
(**From Richard Sennett’s The Craftsman.)
(^Sy Montgomery, quoted in Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: How to be a Good Creature.)


THE BIGGEST THIN|SILENCE DOODLES YET

These images have just gone up outside The University of Edinburgh Chaplaincy: a bright story-board telling of the kind of space students and staff will find in the Chaplaincy, part of a rebranding of sign-ware for this university service to all members of the grand institution.

Why not tell your story brightly?

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