These are my most favourite words of all

This library, it
is a people portkey of
possibilities,
where imagination and
reality join and scheme.*

Who spoke to us our favourite words?  Words that changed something, still change something, hold us in this way of change?

Seth Godin introduces me to samizdat:

‘Samizdat (Russian: самизда́т; IPA: [səmɨzˈdat]) was a key form of dissident activity across the Soviet bloc in which individuals reproduced censored and underground publications by hand and passed the documents from reader to reader. This grassroots practice to evade official Soviet censorship was fraught with danger, as harsh punishments were meted out to people caught possessing or copying censored materials. Vladimir Bukovsky summarized it as follows: “Samizdat: I write it myself, edit it myself, censor it myself, publish it myself, distribute it myself, and spend jail time for it myself.”[1]‘**

I may pass forward subversively-good words but there’s a point at which I must begin to form my own:

‘But writing it–writing it is the true disruption. Because the act of saying it, saying it clearly, saying it aloud, this is what galvanizes people and leads to action.’^

Perhaps, from an unusual source, Tom Hodgkinson helps us to see there are at least two parts too this prooduction.  Hodgkinson, co-founder of The Idler Academy writes some practical things about spreadsheets for running a business:

‘There are two types of cost: the cost of actual materials […] and the cost incurred every month to run things […] called ‘overheads.’^^

Our words come from our changing lives.  We have to invest in the things which make change at the deepest levels of our lives – then we’ll have something worth saying.

It’s always more about ‘the direction of depth rather than distance.’*^  And if we look deep, we might find more than we expected already there.

(*Some tanka for a #libraryofawesome exploration – a library of the future in which the people bring the resources and together create something new.)
(**Samizdat article, from Wikipedia.)
(^From Seth Godin’s blog Samizdat is in the writing.)
(^^From Tom Hodgkinson’s Business for Bohemians.)
(*^From Kosuke Koyama’s Three Mile an Hour God.)

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