a picture book of wonder

The person who notices something profound and wonderful may not have the understanding or words to explain it but they can tell a story or maybe draw a picture.  If it’s for real, science will catch up.*

First there’s the description, then there’s the explanation.  Then everything joins up, one thing is connected to everything in our quantum universe of holons and fractals.

Busyness pollutes, noise pollutes but we can all be “noticers.”  :

‘There’s so much noise around us all the time […] .  The solution isn’t to add to the noise, though; it’s to save energy.  It’s to speak at the right time, instead of all the time.’**

Silence is powerful.

Silence and solitude more so.

Silence and solitude and slowness are the most powerful of all.

Allowing us to gaze upon the unknown, we’re able to identify and ask our questions, as Warren Berger encourages when he speaks to all the inquisitives among us:

‘Questioners learn to love that great unknown – it’s the land of opportunity, in terms of creativity and innovation.’^

The questions that most itch and urge us move us into our quest or journey.  My friend and mentor Alex McManus writes in Makers of Fire about how we are a mystery wrapped in a question.  This is our DNA.

When we wish to explore, we find that a little silence added to our days goes a long, long way.

(*See Jonah Lehrer’s Proust was a Neuroscientist to see how we can anticipate truths and realities.)
(**From gapingvoid’s blog A Welcome Moment of Quiet.)
(^From Warren Berger’s A More Beautiful Question.)

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