Something somewhere

Tackling the correspondence problem involves breaking down an observed solution into its constuituent parts, and then reassembling those parts in a different way … an ability to apply that underlying principle in a novel setting.*
Annie Murphy Paul

We don’t want to feel less when we have finished a book; we want to feel that new possibilities have been opened to us.**
Madeleine L’Engle

When the pressure’s on
us
or on a
system,
we see the truth of
how things are:

“Connais-toi pour t’ameliorer” (“Know yourself to improve yourself”).^

Then follows the decision:
Do we accept this or
do something about it?
If we want to do something about it,
A good place to begin is by
copying others,
To imitate those who are ahead of us.
Dreamwhispering does this,
Borrowing from anywhere and
everywhere.
This is solving the
“Correspondence problem,”
How that over there might work over
here.
Of course, we’re doing this all the time
in many small ways –
Such as changing something about yourself after reading a book;
What this is suggesting is that
we do it in big ways, too.
To be able to innovate in this way is itself a
creative act.
Towards copying,
Don’t see the way something is being expressed or used
as being the only way;
even words used for a totally different purpose
than the one you have in mind
can inspire and guide:

When you get past making labels for things it is possible to combine and transform element into new things. Look at things until their import, identity, name, use, and descriptions have dissolved.^^

Whatever the reality you are facing,
There is something, somewhere,
Waiting to improve things.

*Annie Murphy Paul’s The Extended Mind;
**Madeleine L’Engle’s Walking on Water;
^Alain de Botton’s Religion for Atheists;
^^Corita Kent, from Corita Kent and Jan Steward’s Learning By Heart.

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